A Friday Post: Death of Anton, by Alan Melville

Hello friends!

It’s Friday, which can only mean one thing – some snippets from a recent read!

BB.Button

Every Friday Book Beginnings on Friday is hosted by Gillion at Rose City Reader where you can share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires.

I’ve recently read another 5* read – Death of Anton, by Alan Melville.

The circus came to town.

It arrived, not with any of the majesty and excitement which herald the arrival of a small circus in a small town, but with all the modern efficiency for which Joseph Carey’s World Famous Circus and Menagerie was famous.

Also every Friday there is The Friday 56, hosted by Freda at Freda’s Voice.

30879-friday2b56These are the rules:

  • Grab a book, any book.
  • Turn to page 56, or 56% on your eReader. If you have to improvise, that is okay.
  • Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grabs you.
  • Post it.
  • Add the URL to your post in the link on Freda’s most recent Friday 56 post.

A snippet from page 56:

Anton threw away his cigarette.

“Lorimer,” he said, “is that the truth? You’ve no idea what has been going on at Joe’s – honestly?”

25571842._SX318_

Book synopsis:

Seven Bengal tigers are the star attraction of Carey’s Circus. Their trainer is the fearless Anton, whose work demands absolute fitness and the steadiest of nerves. When Anton is found lying dead in the tigers’ cage, it seems that he has lost control and been mauled by the tigers – but Detective-Inspector Minto of Scotland Yard is not convinced.

Minto’s investigations lead him deep into the circus world of tents and caravans, clowns and acrobats, human and animal performers. No one is above suspicion. Carey, the circus-owner with a secret to hide; Dodo, the clown whose costume is scratched as if by a claw; and Lorimer, the trapeze artist jealous of his flirtatious wife – all come under Minto’s scrutiny as the mystery deepens.

This amusing and light-hearted novel from the golden age of British crime writing has long been neglected, and this new edition will help to restore Melville’s reputation as an author of extremely entertaining detective fiction.

What do you think? Does it appeal to you?

10 thoughts on “A Friday Post: Death of Anton, by Alan Melville

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s