A Fridy Post: The Unquiet Dead, by Ausma Zehanat Khan

Hello everyone!

It’s Friday again – so I’m sharing some snippets of my current read.

BB.Button

Every Friday Book Beginnings on Friday is hosted by Gillion at Rose City Reader where you can share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires.

My current read is “The Unquiet Dead”, by Ausma Zehanat Khan.

Esa Khattak turned his head to the right, offering the universal salaam at the conclusion of the evening prayer.

Also every Friday there is The Friday 56, hosted by Freda at Freda’s Voice.

30879-friday2b56These are the rules:

  • Grab a book, any book.
  • Turn to page 56, or 56% on your eReader. If you have to improvise, that is okay.
  • Find any sentence (or a few, just don’t spoil it) that grabs you.
  • Post it.
  • Add the URL to your post in the link on Freda’s most recent Friday 56 post.

A snippet from page 56:

Melanie’s pouting lips snapped tight, but the massive injections of collagen she had endured meant they couldn’t look anything but sultry.

34623732._SY475_

Book synopsis (from Goodreads):

Detective Esa Khattak is in the midst of his evening prayers when he receives a phone call asking that he and his partner, Detective Rachel Getty, look into the death of a local man who has fallen off a cliff. At first Christopher Drayton’s death—which looks like an accident—doesn’t seem to warrant a police investigation, especially not from Khattak and Rachel’s team, which handles minority-sensitive cases. But it soon comes to light that Drayton might have been living under an assumed name, and he may not have been the upstanding Canadian citizen he appeared to be. In fact, he may have been a Bosnian war criminal with ties to the Srebrenica massacre of 1995. And if that’s true, any number of people could have had reason to help him to his death.

As Rachel and Khattak dig deeper into the life and death of Christopher Drayton, every question seems to lead only to more questions, and there are no easy answers. Did the specters of Srebrenica return to haunt Drayton at last, or had he been keeping secrets of an entirely different nature? Or, after all, did a man just fall to his death in a tragic accident?

In her spellbinding debut, The Unquiet Dead, Ausma Zehanat Khan has written a complex and provocative story of loss, redemption, and the cost of justice that will linger with readers long after turning the final page.

6 thoughts on “A Fridy Post: The Unquiet Dead, by Ausma Zehanat Khan

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s